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How to grow arugula microgreens

Updated: Mar 13, 2020


microgreens arugula

Do you know how to grow arugula microgreens? Well you'll know how to grow them after reading this post. You won’t regret missing out on this! We promise.

What is Arugula

Arugula is a leafy green plant that belongs to the genus Eruca and the family Brassicaceae. It is closely related to radish, kale, and cauliflower. Arugula has a number of different names depending on what area of the world you are in. These various names include garden rocket, rucola, roquette, and colewort. Arugula microgreens grows to a height of 2.5-10 cm (1-3 in) tall – depending on the variety you choose, your yummy microgreens are ready. It is grown on a large scale for commercial consumption but it also exists as a wild species throughout the world. It is predominantly used in the Americas, Europe, and North Africa.

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Arugula Nutrition Facts

Arugula is a leafy green plant packed with vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants. It is a good dietary choice for a healthy body and keeping the mind clear and focused. It contains high levels of folic acid and antioxidants like vitamin C, vitamin K, and vitamin A, which makes it integral in the fight against free radicals. It is packed with carotenoids, as well as many other minerals like potassium, manganese, iron, and calcium, all of which are beneficial and necessary elements in a person’s diet. Arugula contains phytochemicals, which are beneficial in preventing cancer. It is also superior to some other leafy greens because unlike other varieties, arugula is low in oxalates, which are chemicals that actually inhibit the absorption of minerals into the body. All in all, arugula is a low-calorie, nutrient-rich food.

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Health Benefits Of Arugula microgreens

The vitamins, minerals, phytochemicals, and antioxidants packed in every leaf of arugula are certainly beneficial to those who incorporate it into their diet.

Detoxifies Body

Arugula is a great source of antioxidants and can greatly increase a person’s ORAC value (Oxygen radical absorbance capacity), which is a method for measuring antioxidant capacities. Antioxidants function to maintain a healthy balance of enzyme reactions within cells, while actively seeking out and destroying the disease-causing free radicals that can attack your system. Your immune system will also thank you for choosing arugula, because antioxidants work to bolster your defenses against simple illnesses like the common cold as well as more complex afflictions, such as cancer, heart diseases, and premature aging

Boosts Bone Health

The presence of vitamin K in arugula gives an anti-inflammatory boost to your body. Vitamin K also spurs an osteotropic activity in cells, meaning that promotes bone formation. The gradual degradation of neural pathways, found in conditions like Alzheimer’s disease, can be slowed down by an increase in intake of vitamin K. As a good source of Vitamin K, the consumption of arugula has been cited as a preventative method of such diseases.

Arugula’s combinative effects of low oxalate levels (allowing more minerals into the system) and the presence of so many minerals in the plant itself make it a strong support system for healthy bones. Sufferers of osteoporosis can see improvements, and arugula can be used as a preventative step as well, ensuring bone health and strength before the age/activity-based effects of bone degeneration become serious.

Boosts Immune System

Arugula is loaded with vitamins and minerals that in some way bolster the defenses of the body’s immune system. The body is stimulated to create white blood cells from the copper in arugula, and the plant has a number of other ways to improve the strength of your immune system.